intel logo Even more Ivy Bridge details leak

By now you've most likely already ready the Ivy Bridge line-up details via Russia, although now more details have come to light via China. A lot of details were missing in the initial leak and we can now fill in the blanks, especially with regards to the graphics and how the upcoming Ivy Bridge processor fit into Intel's echo system compared to the current Sandy Bridge processors.

By now you've most likely already ready the Ivy Bridge line-up details via Russia, although now more details have come to light via China. A lot of details were missing in the initial leak and we can now fill in the blanks, especially with regards to the graphics and how the upcoming Ivy Bridge processor fit into Intel's echo system compared to the current Sandy Bridge processors.

Starting with the graphics, we have two graphics options in the desktop parts, Intel HD Graphics 4000 and Intel HD Graphics 2500. The main difference here beyond clock speeds is that we're expecting the execution units to be at least 1/3 greater in the HD 4000 parts compared to the HD 2500 parts, unless Intel has changed something last minute. The Core i7-3770K, Core i7-3770, Core i7-3770S, Core i7-3770T, Core i5-3570K as well as the oddly named Core i5-3475S will be the only ones with HD 4000 graphics, the rest get to make do with HD 2500 graphics.

ivy bridge table 1 Even more Ivy Bridge details leak

The base clock speed for all Ivy Bridge desktop processors will start at 650MHz, although we'll see a max dynamic clock speed of anything between 1050 and 1150MHz depending on the SKU. For most, this is likely to have little to no difference. Do keep in mind that the max dynamic clock speed may never be achieved, especially if you're overclocking the CPU, as the CPU and GPU are sharing the same max TDP, so good cooling is key here.

ivy bridge table 2 Even more Ivy Bridge details leak

Intel still appears to be removing features like hardware virtualization on its K-models for whatever reason, as well as support for it trusted execution technology. It's funny how we end up paying more for less when it comes to Intel's high-end, overclockable CPUs.

As for the product positioning, well, the Core i7-3770K are placed below the upcoming Core i7-3820 Sandy Bridge-E CPU and it will be very interesting to see how the two compare in real world situations, especially with a mere 100MHz base clock speed difference between the two. Oddly enough the Core i7-3770 is clocked 100MHz slower than its K suffix counterpart this time around, something that wasn't the case with the current Sandy Bridge processors and something that isn't the case for the Core i5-3570's.

ivy bridge table 3 Even more Ivy Bridge details leak

We were quite surprised by the fact that Intel placed the Core i5-3570, 3550 and 3450 (the 3470 wasn't in the product positioning list) ahead of the current Core i5-2500K, especially as the Core i5-3450 is 200MHz slower and Ivy Bridge wasn't expect to bring that much extra performance when it comes to the CPU core itself. Once again, it'll be interesting to see how things play out when it comes to real world performance, as this is where it counts.

The original post on Chinese website Corescn.com requires you to log in, so instead we've included a link to German Computerbase who has some additional details on the subject. Do take this with a pinch of salt, as although it does look legit and lines up nicely with the details from Overclockers.ru, there's a chance that things will still change before the launch.

Source: Computerbase