intellogo Exclusive: Additional ULV Ivy Bridge processor unveiled

We've already seen details of Intel's upcoming Core i7-3667U and Core i5-3427U ULV Ivy Bridge processors back in December, but now details of an additional three ULV models have reached us. On top of that, we have details on the programmable TDP of all five ULV models and Intel has clearly allowed for a lot of flexibility for its partners.

We've already seen details of Intel's upcoming Core i7-3667U and Core i5-3427U ULV Ivy Bridge processors back in December, but now details of an additional three ULV models have reached us. On top of that, we have details on the programmable TDP of all five ULV models and Intel has clearly allowed for a lot of flexibility for its partners.

Let's start with the programmable TDP of the two models we already know about. The Core i5-3427U at stock 17W TDP will operate at 1.8GHz, but it can go down to 14W and all the way up to 25W. All models can go down in terms of TDP, but not all can go up. Its lowest speed is 800MHz, again something that is a common feature across the entire range, although at 25W TDP it can operate as high as 2.3GHz without going into turbo mode. The Core i7-3667U will be able to operate at speeds of 2.5GHz at a 25W TDP, up from 2GHz at 17W TDP.

As for the new CPU models, at the bottom we have the first Core i3 models in the Ivy Bridge ULV range, the Core i3-3217U. This is a 1.8GHz model with no option to increase the TDP for higher speeds, but again it can be lowered to 14W TDP and speeds of as low as 800MHz. As per all current Core i3 processors, it also lacks turbo boost and as such won't overclock. It also features slightly slower graphics at the top speed compared to the previous two models, as it tops out at 1050MHz rather than 1150MHz. However it does support DDR3 1600MHz memory and it has 3MB of cache.

Next up we have the Core i5-3317U which is a 1.7GHz part, again with no option to increase the TDP, but it has the same low TDP options as the Core i3-3217U. Here we're looking at turbo support though at up to 2.4GHz for both cores and 2.6GHz for a single core, making it slightly slower than the Core i5-3427U. The graphics clock is also the same as for the Core i3-3217U, but in this case it's unlocked and can be overclocked, although that would be down to the notebook manufacturer to add support for this, so it's unlikely that this is something we'll see implemented in a lot of Ultrabooks.

The third and final new model is the Core i7-3517U, a 1.9GHz part that supports the higher 25W TDP and as such an increased clock speed of up to 2.4GHz. In turbo mode it'll go up to 2.8GHz for two cores and 3GHz on a single core. The GPU clock speeds are the same as for the Core i7-3667U and we're of course also looking at 4MB of cache here.

What's interesting is that all the models ending with 17 in the model number appears to be OEM processors for consumer level Ultrabooks and as such lack support for Intel vPro and TXT technology, something the Core i7-3667U and Core i5-3427U offers. The Core i3-3217U also lacks support for the new digital random number generator, VT-d and AES-NI, but this isn't really a big surprise. So there you have it, several new Ultrabook processors are coming, but with the "delay" this means we won't be seeing them in retail products until June or possibly even a little later in the year.