We've seen pictures of the FM1 socket, the FM1 CPUs and even the mobile test board from AMD, but what we have for you today is the first picture of AMD's FM1 desktop test board. Please keep in mind that this is not an indication of what final production motherboards will look like, nor does it represent a final product by any means, but what it does give us is a glimpse into what AMD's Fusion motherboards for the FM1 socket will have to offer.

We've seen pictures of the FM1 socket, the FM1 CPUs and even the mobile test board from AMD, but what we have for you today is the first picture of AMD's FM1 desktop test board. Please keep in mind that this is not an indication of what final production motherboards will look like, nor does it represent a final product by any means, but what it does give us is a glimpse into what AMD's Fusion motherboards for the FM1 socket will have to offer.

As you can see from the picture, AMD's test board doesn't exactly look like a retail board and it has a lot of test points for oscilloscopes and other types of test equipment. However, what we can see is that the board has native USB 3.0 support thanks to the internal USB 3.0 header so this is most like an FCH A75 based board. As it should be, it's a single chipset board, although it appears that the FCH A75 requires active cooling which is somewhat disappointing. That said, hopefully a larger passive cooler will be enough on retail boards, or at least that's what we're hoping for.

The board clearly has an HDMI, DisplayPort and D-sub connector and it should also have a pair of rear USB 3.0 ports alongside what we'd guess are four USB 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, six audio jacks and what appears to be a vertical eSATA connector. The slots on the board appears to be a single x16 PCI Express slot, two open ended x4 PCI Express slots, a mini PCI Express slot and a PCI slot, as well as a x1 PCI Express slot located at the centre of the board.

Surprisingly the board has a very small VRM design with what looks like a 3+2 phase design. Considering that the APUs will have a pretty powerful GPU inside them, we expected a more advanced VRM design. Apart from that there isn't much to say, the board has four DIMM slots, five internal SATA connectors and a lot of pin headers that we can't really make out what they're for. One final note would be the CPU retention, or the lack of one. There appears to be space for one that would be similar to the AM3+ split design we've seen from ASRock and Asus, but we're just going to have to wait and see what AMD comes up with.