sharkbay 5 Exclusive: Intels mobile Haswell chipset names revealed

Intel has as yet to launch all of its mobile Ivy Bridge chipsets, as we're still waiting for a couple of business-end chipsets, but VR-Zone can now exclusively reveal Intel's next generation mobile chipsets for the Haswell CPUs. Interestingly, Intel has cut back from no less than seven chipset for Ivy Bridge to a more acceptable five chipsets for Haswell, or the same amount of options as it offered for Sandy Bridge.

Intel has as yet to launch all of its mobile Ivy Bridge chipsets, as we're still waiting for a couple of business-end chipsets, but VR-Zone can now exclusively reveal Intel's next generation mobile chipsets for the Haswell CPUs. Interestingly, Intel has cut back from no less than seven chipset for Ivy Bridge to a more acceptable five chipsets for Haswell, or the same amount of options as it offered for Sandy Bridge.

Part of the reason for the move to fewer chipsets is that Intel is moving to a one chip platform for some of its mobile Haswell processors, or should that be SoCs? As we've reported time and time again, the platform will be known as Shark Bay and so far the chipsets have been known as Lynx Point and in the case of the single chip solution Intel is putting what it's calling Lynx Point LP – LP for low power we presume – on the same package as the CPU and GPU.

With that out of the way, the five chipsets that will arrive for Shark Bay are the HM87, HM85 and HM80 for general consumer notebooks, the UM83 for Ultrabooks and the QM87 for business focused notebooks for the corporate market space. Only the HM87 and QM87 chipsets will support RAID and Intel Smart Response technology, which in the latter case we don't understand why Intel wouldn't want to add to its entire range of mobile chipsets, as it makes a lot more sense in a notebook than on a desktop.

That's sadly all the information we have on the new mobile chipsets for the time being and it's of course possible that things can change between now and next year, as they so often do. What we are expecting though in terms of features on these new chipsets is a full set of SATA 6Gbps ports as well as additional USB 3.0 ports, although as to how important this will be in the notebook segment is questionable, as very few notebooks has more than two SATA devices and three or four USB ports.