zuckerberg Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg defends hackers

Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, has defended hackers in a lengthy letter on what he considers a growing misconception about a skill which he says is essential to his company's success.

Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, has defended hackers in a lengthy letter on what he considers a growing misconception about a skill which he says is essential to his company's success.

 
“The word 'hacker' has an unfairly negative connotation from being portrayed in the media as people who break into computers,” the 27-year-old wrote. “In reality, hacking just means building something quickly or testing the boundaries of what can be done. Like most things, it can be used for good or bad, but the vast majority of hackers I've met tend to be idealistic people who want to have a positive impact on the world.”
 
Zuckerberg not only defended the profession of hacking, but said that every few months Facebook holds a “hackaton” where coders work to build a better implementation of an idea. He said that many of the social network's products, such as the timeline, chat, video, and mobile development, are the results of such hacking activity.
 
zuckerberg Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg defends hackers
 
Hacking has gained notoriety over the past year or two, particularly with the rise of hacktivist groups like Anonymous and Lulzsec, both of which have caused widespread disruption to internet services. There are many other hacking groups in operation too, some with darker and more criminal motives, such as stealing credit card information. Other groups work to expose criminal hackers or test the security of websites and servers, showing that things are not always black and white when hacking is concerned.
 
The letter was given to investors just as the company launched a bid to raise $5 billion in public shares. It is not clear if the message was intended to assert Zuckerberg control of the company, which he will still control 57 percent of after the initial public offering, and it remains to be seen if some investors will be spooked by his pro-hacker rhetoric.