Mark Zuckerberg has taken center stage again, and this time around he and his supporters are aiming to bring down the cost of mobile internet for global consumers.

connect internetdotorg Facebook wants everyone to have dirt cheap internet access

Many of us take for granted that we have access to what seems like an unfathomable amount of information via the internet, but there are still areas around that world that are only beginning to link up with the hub.

That said, Facebook’s business relies heavily on linking up with people, and so we all know where Zuckerberg and his supposed alliance, which includes Samsung, Qualcomm, Nokia, MediaTek, Opera and Ericsson, are going with this whole idea of making the internet much more accessible and affordable.

Facebook currently has around 1 billion users, about 700 million of which are reportedly active on a daily basis.  For continued growth, however, the dorm room concocted social networking platform has to reach more users, and that means tapping into personal computers that aren’t connected yet or steal users away from other regional social networking platforms.

The League of Zuckerbergs is aiming to reduce the cost of mobile internet access to 1 percent of their current local rates.  Firms that have signed up to be parts of the league have their brands embedded into the group’s headquarter, internet.org.

Facebook and its allies aren’t interested in building up a backbone that will link everyone in the world.  Instead, what they will do is “collaborate to develop and adopt technologies that make mobile connectivity more affordable and decrease cost of delivering data to people.” Beyond technological developments, the alliance claims that they will help and support partners in the “development of sustainable new business models and services that make easier for people to access the internet.”

We don’t have to question the motives of these firms, as it’s relatively clear what their main objectives are for supporting the internet-for-all initiative.  If they succeed in reducing the cost of internet access to developing portions of the world, that would be great.  If they don’t, then some other ‘alliance’ will have to step up, and enjoy the pot of gold if they can catch the illusive leprechaun.