fairchild Fairchild Semiconductor shrinks Driver MOSFETs for Ultrabooks

Driver MOSFETs, more commonly known as DrMOS are a key part in the VRM design in modern computers and despite being smaller than traditional MOSFET designs, once you start looking at notebooks and even more so at Ultrabooks, these chips actually take up quite a lot of space. Now Fairchild Semiconductors have managed to shrink the foot print of its Generation II XS DrMOS by 50 percent to make them more suitable for use in Ultrabooks.

Driver MOSFETs, more commonly known as DrMOS are a key part in the VRM design in modern computers and despite being smaller than traditional MOSFET designs, once you start looking at notebooks and even more so at Ultrabooks, these chips actually take up quite a lot of space. Now Fairchild Semiconductors have managed to shrink the foot print of its Generation II XS DrMOS by 50 percent to make them more suitable for use in Ultrabooks.

The chips in question are called FDMF6708N and measure a mere 6x6mm and come in a PQFN package.  Beyond being smaller, Fairchild has also implemented something called Zero Cross Detect or ZCD which allows for improved light load performance which results in improved battery life. Fairchild claims 2.5 percent improved efficiency at peak loads of 15A and a six percent better efficiency at a 30A full load compared to its nearest competitor when connected to a 19V power source.

By integrating more features into the same package, Fairchild's new DrMOS also helps simplify the PCB design by allowing for shorter PCB trances, the use of fewer components and reduced thermals at higher frequencies. Sadly this is one of those aspects where it's really up to the device maker, but hopefully we'll see this kind of product in future Ultrabooks, as when it comes to battery life, every little helps. The FDMF6708N is priced at US$ 1.86 a piece in quantities of 1,000 units, although as multiple parts are being used in one and the same Ultrabook and these things are usually bought in far larger quantities, we'd doubt that this is anywhere near the actual cost for the Ultrabook manufacturers.

Source: Fairchild Semiconductor