megaupload song hits big on the web umg tries to take it down FBI submits incomplete evidence in Megauploads Kim Dotcom extradition case

The FBI has sparked a debate amongst the lawyers in Kim Dotcom's extradition hearing by submitting just 40 pages of emails out of the 22 million stored on Megaupload's servers.

The ongoing Megaupload saga continues, with arguments over what evidence Kim Dotcom will be allowed to see in order to prepare his defense. A New Zealand judge has ordered the FBI to copy 150TB of potential evidence that they seized from the Megaupload servers they seized, though it’s still unclear as to how much of the data Dotcom will be given access to. Now, it appears that the FBI has “cherry-picked” just 40 pages of evidence out of some 22 million emails stored on the cyberlocker site’s servers; they intend to hand over these 40 pages before an extradition hearing, sparking a heated disagreement between the prosecutors and Dotcom’s defense lawyers that could delay that hearing.

The head of Dotcom’s legal team has said that the summary document is inadequate; the legal team is being forced to argue their case with “their hands tied behind their backs.” The Crown Prosecutor for New Zealand, however, has said that having all the information for a hearing that merely determines whether or not Dotcom can be tried in the US is unnecessary. If the case does indeed proceed to an American court, this issue will be argued again, delaying any trial even further.

The Department of Justice has suffered some major criticism for their handling of the case against the eccentric Dotcom; the criticism stems from many areas, including the use of illegal search warrants in order to secure the evidence for the case as well as their refusal to return non-infringing material to the Megaupload users. The Department of Justice is still charging Dotcom with running what they call an “international organized criminal enterprise,” though at this rate an actual trial is still a long way off.