600px US FCC Seal svg FCC wants broadcasters to sell UHF to carriers

The increase in mobile data usage worldwide is putting a lot of strain on the spectrums that carriers currently own.  Rather than discourage the growth of data usage in the U.S, the Federal Communications Commission is hashing out a plan to encourage broadcasters to auction off their frequencies to mobile carriers in an effort to accommodate the increased data demand.

The increase in mobile data usage worldwide is putting a lot of strain on the spectrums that carriers currently own.  Rather than discourage the growth of data usage in the U.S, the Federal Communications Commission is hashing out a plan to encourage broadcasters to auction off their frequencies to mobile carriers in an effort to accommodate the increased data demand.

antennas FCC wants broadcasters to sell UHF to carriers

Broadcasters are asked to sell off their ultrahigh frequency (UHF) or spectrums that they are not using to mobile carriers.  If any of the broadcasters decide to auction away their spectrums it will be strictly voluntary. 

The agency will meet on September 28 to decide on whether or not it should convince broadcasters to give up their spectrums.  Even if the FCC decides it’s a good idea to begin working on an incentive-based action, the rules probably won’t be finalized for another year.  Then, maybe in 2014, there will be an actual auction.

For now, U.S data lovers will have to deal with the data limit on their plans, or upgrade to a pricey unlimited data package.  Freeing up the airway will benefit carriers as well as consumers, but it remains to be seen whether or not broadcasters are willing to sell. 

Julius Genachowski, FCC Chairman, obviously wants to strike some sort of deal between broadcasters and carriers, because according to him, we need to “meet the needs of the 21st century.”

“To ensure ongoing innovation in mobile broadband, we must pursue several strategies vigorously: freeing up more spectrum for both licensed use and for unlicensed services like Wi-Fi; driving faster speeds, greater capacity, and ubiquitous mobile Internet coverage; and taking additional steps to ensure that our invisible infrastructure for mobile innovation can meet the needs of the 21st century.”