Fewer Apple fans flock to stores as new iPad goes on sale

Queues for Apple's third generation iPad were not as big as those for the iPad 2 last year, suggesting potentially weaker sales for the Cupertino, California-based company.

Queues for Apple's third generation iPad were not as big as those for the iPad 2 last year, suggesting potentially weaker sales for the Cupertino, California-based company.

 
Apple's store in Regent Street, London saw over 600 people line up for the iPad 2's launch, but that number has dwindled to roughly 400 people for today's launch of the so-called “new iPad.”
 
While this does not necessarily account for interest in the device across the world, it will be a worrying figure for investors and for Apple's new CEO, Tim Cook, who took over from Steve Jobs last year.
 
However, a study by Dynamo PR, which interviewed those standing in the queue, found that 63 percent of those waiting to buy the latest iPad were PC owners, up from 44 percent last year and just 25 percent two years ago for the launch of the initial iPad.
 
 Fewer Apple fans flock to stores as new iPad goes on sale
 
This is significant, as it means that more PC users are considering tablet computers as either a replacement for or a complementary system to their desktop or laptop computers. Apple said last week that it is planning a post-PC future, and while it is unlikely that PCs will got he way of the dodo, there are clearly more alternative devices being bought than ever.
 
Other findings in the report showed that a whopping 88 percent of those in line were men, while the average age was 26, supporting the public perception of technology enthusiasts as being young males.
 
Some people queued for unholy amounts of time. For example, one man managed to secure a prominent place at the front by waiting for an insane 141 hours. Say what we will about Apple fanbois, but that's dedication.
 
“The surprising difference in this year’s iPad launch compared to other years is the actual number of people queuing,” said Paul Cockerton, co-founder of Dynamo PR. “It’s significantly less than previous years. Whether that means pre-orders have been more successful, or selling in other retail stores takes some of this burden only Apple would be able to answer.”
 
Source: The Telegraph