fflogo Finalized builds of Firefox 5 show up in Mozillas FTP servers

Mozilla may have set today's date (21 June) as the day Firefox 5 is officially released for public download, but it seems that impatient users may not have to wait for the official launch in order to get their hands on the latest version of the Firefox web browser. Apparently, Mozilla has already moved the finalized builds of the web browser into its FTP servers well ahead of the official launch date, and the good news is that one can easily score early access to the servers and retrieve a copy of the browser…with a little trickery, of course.

fflogo Finalized builds of Firefox 5 show up in Mozillas FTP servers

Do you remember the story we ran some time back, in which we described Mozilla's plans  to drastically shorten the development time for the fifth version of its popular Firefox browser, and that users could expect the browser to be made available for public download by June, which is approximately three months after Firefox 4 was launched? Well, as it turns out, the good developers over at Mozilla have managed to keep to their schedule, for the finalized builds of the Firefox 5 web browser have been spotted in the company's servers.

However, attempting to gain early access to the finalized versions of Firefox 5 is not as simple as simply clicking on some hyperlinks in Mozilla's FTP servers; this is due to the fact that Mozilla has set up its FTP servers to utilize the http protocol when its archives are accessed via a web browser, and clicking on the "5.0" folder in the "Releases" page will throw up the following message instead:

ff5 Finalized builds of Firefox 5 show up in Mozillas FTP servers


Replacing the http portion of the url with ftp, however, will result in the following page being shown:

ff6 Finalized builds of Firefox 5 show up in Mozillas FTP servers


We have not managed to try out the browser yet, but various online sources have claimed that Firefox 5 is not expected to feature any radical changes or improvements over its predecessor, due to its much tighter release schedule. Instead, most of the tweaks that have been made to the browser are seemingly centered on "better JavaScript, memory and network performance, and improved standards support for canvas, HTML5, XHR, and MathML markup languages", along with security fixes for its implementation of WebGL.