Ah yes, we're getting close to Intel's unveiling of Ivy Bridge and now we know what to expect from at least some of the Core i3 models that should be launching sometime next quarter. Details of five upcoming Ivy Bridge Core i3 processors had shown up online with full specifications in tow.

Ah yes, we're getting close to Intel's unveiling of Ivy Bridge and now we know what to expect from at least some of the Core i3 models that should be launching sometime next quarter. Details of five upcoming Ivy Bridge Core i3 processors had shown up online with full specifications in tow.

As always with Intel we have a rather peculiar mishmash of models and as such we're looking at three 55W parts and two low power 35W parts. Starting from the bottom we have the power frugal Core i3-3220T, a 2.8GHz part bettering its fastest Sandy Bridge sibling by 200MHz. The Core i3's are of course all dual-core models with HyperThreading and no turbo boost. Intel has kept the cache at the same level as with Sandy Bridge, but the memory support has been bumped to 1333 and 1600MHz, just as with the higher-end Ivy Bridge models. The Core i3-3220T has Intel HD Graphics 2500 with a base clock of 650MHz and a top dynamic speed of 1050MHz. It's slightly faster counterpart is the Core i3-3240T and the only difference between the two is that in this case we're looking at a core clock of an even 3GHz.

Moving over to the standard 55W desktop models we start with the Core i3-3220, a modest 3.3GHz part with Intel HD Graphics 2500 with the same clock speeds as the low power models. In fact, besides the higher clock speeds, we can't spot any differences. The fastest Core i3 model will be the Core i3-3240 which is only a smidgen faster at 3.4GHz and once again there are no other differences that we can spot in the leaked specs. The third and final part is potentially the most interesting one, the Core i3-3225 and if you remember from the Sandy Bridge Core i3 models, a 5 on the end means high-end graphics. In this case we're looking at Intel HD 4000 graphics, although the clock speed is the same with a base clock of 650MHz and a peak dynamic clock of 1050MHz.

Although we can't be entire sure that this information is correct, or up to date, it looks like Intel has managed to conjure up yet another SKU differentiator and we have a feeling that this one will upset a lot of people. Intel doesn't appear to offer PCI Express 3.0 support for its Ivy Bridge Core i3 models, whereas all the Core i5 and Core i7 models has a tick in the corresponding box. This feels like a cheap move by Intel, despite the limited usage of a faster PCI Express interface today. In other words, if you for some reason need PCI Express 3.0 support, you need to invest in a more expensive CPU. At least back in the good old days you could put a cheap CPU in a more expensive motherboard and still get all the functionality, not so any more.

Source: Zol.com.cn