Picture 3 270x287 Former Apple exec says Nokia should abandon current CEO and adopt Android

Nokia, according to Jean-Louis Gassée, should fire current CEO, Stephen Elop, dismiss its current board, ditch Microsoft Windows Phone, and adopt Google Android.

Nokia, according to Jean-Louis Gassée, should fire current CEO, Stephen Elop, dismiss its current board, ditch Microsoft Windows Phone, and adopt Google Android.

Gassée, former executive for Apple in the late 80’s and 90’s, claims that Elop knows nothing about what makes smartphone, smartphone. 

“He has zero experience in terms of what makes a smartphone maker tick. And what is his experience in supply chain management? Zero,” he told Computing in an exclusive interview.

Elop has been widely criticized for his decision to not offer Windows Phone 8 upgrades to Nokia's current line up of  phones.  This is a puzzling move considering major Android smartphone manufactures—such as Samsung—offer OS upgrades to their smartphones even after the device has been released. 

Furthermore, Gassée accuses Elop of not carrying out business strategies that he should have.

“He did a very good thing, which is to tell everyone that it is an eco-system ‘play', not a platform play. That was very insightful. But then he reveals the plans without implementing them. Everyone knew that Symbian phones were dead-enders and Nokia's partners – the carriers – ran away from Symbian in large numbers,” Gassée gave Elop a small compliment but tagged on a lengthy criticism. 

When Gassée said Elop “reveals the plans” he was referring to a Nokia blog leak that ultimately gave away the company’s strategy. 

Now, onto Nokia’s ultimate failure.  Gassée says that Elop should have eloped with Android instead of Microsoft.  By making Windows Phone their primary platform, Gassée affirms that Nokia did not side “with the winner.”

The clear cut winners in the smartphone business, as of this moment, is Google’s Android and Apple's iOS, and since iOS is exclusive to Apple, that leaves Android the only alternative to siding with the “winner”.

However, contrary Gassée’s belief about the winners in the smartphone arena, the International Data Research (IDC) firm predicts that Windows Phone will match iOS’s market share by 2016.

Gassée has every reason to believe that Elop is not leading Nokia in the right direction, but we will have to wait and see if Nokia's decision to stick with its current CEO (and hope that their bank account doesn’t run dry until 2016) will pay off.