mobilebattery Free mobile apps drain battery power

Free mobile apps use considerably more battery power than their paid equivalents, due to resource-hogging advertisements, according to a study by Purdue University.

Free mobile apps use considerably more battery power than their paid equivalents, due to resource-hogging advertisements, according to a study by Purdue University.

 
Researchers at the Indiana-based university found that third-party advertising services that are attached to free apps consume a significant amount of power, with one example accounting for 75 percent of the app's total energy consumption.
 
Popular bird-flinging game Angry Birds was one of the main test apps employed, with the report finding that the game itself only used 20 percent of the total energy output. A whopping 45 percent of power was used to find out the user's location in order to provide targeted advertising, which the remainder of the power provided.
 
Another issue that was discovered is what is called a “3G tail,” where a 3G connection is left open for up to 10 seconds after a download has been completed, resulting in a needless loss of power, and a potential data charge for the user.
 
mobilebattery Free mobile apps drain battery power
 
While the advertising model allows developers to create free content, the study's author, Abhinav Pathak, said that energy optimisation needs to be taken more seriously.
 
The tests were made using popular apps on both the Android and Windows Phone mobile platforms, but tests could not be conducted on Apple's iOS due to the company's software restrictions. The findings are likely to be the same, however.
 
Battery life is becoming an increasing concern for mobile users, as smartphones and tablet computers consume huge volumes of power, particularly if the user leaves apps like email and Facebook running in the background. Battery technology has not developed at the same pace, which means that energy conservation is critical if users want to get a decent amount of time out of a single charge.
 
Source: BBC
Image Credit: Tomasz Sienicki