dscf0002 Fujitsu announces new Sandy Bridge notebooks for Spring 2011

For technology enthusiasts who demand nothing but the latest in hardware for their PCs, having a system that boasts Intel's current Sandy Bridge platform is no longer a luxury, but a minimum requirement. And Fujitsu has seen to it that the local market will not be left high and dry without their dose of 'sand' in the first half of 2011: the Japanese OEM has just unveiled its latest Spring collection of notebooks for the year in an event held at the Hosted By The Patio cafe located in Alexandra Road today, and you can bet that all of them come bundled with the latest Sand(-y Bridge) courtesy of Intel.

fujitsulogo Fujitsu announces new Sandy Bridge notebooks for Spring 2011

This might not necessarily apply to Singapore, but in other areas where countries are fortunate enough to experience the seven seasons, it is usually understood that spring and summer are the two seasons where frolicking in the sandy beaches is a top priority. After all, those are the only two seasons that offer favourable weather conditions to make such an activity possible.

Of course, with Singapore being on the other end of the scale in having to deal with the weather control system being jammed at 'Summer' permanently, frolicking in the sandy beaches is not exactly the first thing that comes to mind for most of us. However, that has not stopped Fujitsu from attempting to bring in some 'sand' into its consumers' life; the Japanese company has officially unveiled its new Spring collection of Lifebooks for this year that feature…yes, you guessed it, Intel's Sandy Bridge platform, along with a few Fujitsu-centric touches.

In her opening address, Katherine Chew, senior business development manager for Fujitsu's PC portfolio in Singapore, spoke about how the Japanese OEM's Spring collection of Sandy Bridge-powered notebooks for 2011 are capable of "delivering a computing experience like no other".

dscf0017 Fujitsu announces new Sandy Bridge notebooks for Spring 2011

"We will be introducing to customers new Fujitsu-specific technology that we have incorporated into our latest products. These technologies will further demonstrate Fujitsu's commitment in delivering quality products to consumers," she said, while adding that Fujitsu's new Spring collection of notebooks will allow the company to cater to a wider range of user profiles.

The spotlight was then handed over to Edmund Lim, Fujitsu's product marketing manager for Southeast Asia, who proceeded to describe some of the technologies that Chew spoke about earlier.

dscf0020 Fujitsu announces new Sandy Bridge notebooks for Spring 2011

Lim described the company's aims of 'going green' as one of the key focuses for the year of 2011, and how it has taken steps to ensure that its notebooks are now capable of significantly reduce their carbon footprint by eliminating what its known as 'vampire current'.

"When your devices are turned off or left on standby without removing the power cable, they will still continue to draw current from the power outlet. That is known as vampire current, and the approximately 7-8% of the average Asian's electrical bill is wasted on this current…to address this problem, Fujitsu is introducing a new zero-watt AC adaptor which will come standard in our premium range of notebooks," he said.

dscf0027 Fujitsu announces new Sandy Bridge notebooks for Spring 2011


Lim also spoke about how Fujitsu has managed to improve the security and privacy of the biometric sensors used in its notebooks by utilizing ultrasonic technology. 

dscf0033 Fujitsu announces new Sandy Bridge notebooks for Spring 2011

"For 2011, we have improved on the biometric sensor's technology: it is more sensitive when reading a user's fingerprints. In addition, we have also added a new feature on the fingerprint sensor. Because the hardware and its accompanying software do not always initialize at the same time, Fujitsu has built an LED indicator right into the sensor itself. This will provide visual feedback to the user as to whether the sensor is read for use or not," he explained.