Fujitsu announced today that it began shipping the computing units for Japan’s Next-Generation Supercomputer, nicknamed the “K” computer. The supercomputer is a central part of the High-Performance Computing Infrastructure initiative led by Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, and is being jointly developed with RIKEN, an independent research institution funded by the Japanese government. The system is expected to go online in autumn 2012.

Tokyo, September 28, 2010 - Fujitsu announced that today it began shipping the computing units for Japan’s Next-Generation Supercomputer, nicknamed the “K” computer (1). The supercomputer is a central part of the High-Performance Computing Infrastructure (HPCI) initiative (2) led by Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), and is being jointly developed with RIKEN, an independent research institution funded by the Japanese government. The system is being delivered to the Kobe-based computational science research facility of RIKEN and is expected to begin operations in autumn 2012 following the installation and tuning process.

The supercomputing system will be comprised of more than 800 computer racks, each installed with ultra-fast CPUs, in a massively interconnected network, crystallizing Fujitsu’s leading-edge technologies for high performance and high reliability (3).

Fujitsu IT Products Limited, the Fujitsu Group’s high-end server manufacturing company located in Ishikawa Prefecture, central Japan, is manufacturing the supercomputer for delivery to the Kobe-based computational science research facility of RIKEN.

Fujitsu has taken part in Japanese government’s Next-Generation Supercomputer project (4) since the design phase in 2006. By building a supercomputer system for performing simulations for various disciplines, Fujitsu aims to contribute to Japan’s science and technology infrastructure as well as maintain the country’s international competitiveness.

More details about the “K” Computer next page.