Fujitsu transforms smartphones into skin care gadgets

Fujitsu launches its Skin Memory service, a cloud-based service that provides a relatively comprehensive skin analysis using a smartphone's camera.

Ever thought of using your smartphone for skin care? If you have, then this new service from Fujitsu might pique your interest. They have just recently unveiled their new cloud-based "Skin Memory" service. Using your smartphone's camera as a scanning device, the service's system is capable of collecting different kinds of information about your skin. It is essentially an analysis tool that assesses the status of your skin by looking at certain elements such as skin tone, dimples, spots, and other things.

There are three basic things required to use the service: the specialized app, a 4MP (at minimum) camera, and the special "Color Frame" card. The Color Frame card has a special hole that would be used to target the skin area that you want to be scanned. Using the special card would enable the app to maintain an accurate analysis despite varying changes in the surrounding lighting. The app was primarily designed for the Android OS, although an iOS version is in the works.

skinmemory02 Fujitsu transforms smartphones into skin care gadgets

After getting a clear snapshot of the target skin area inside the Color Frame card, the picture will then be sent to their system, where it would be studied by an image analyzer. Users may be able to compare data from previous scans, as well as data from skin scans made by other people. The service will allow for upgraded functions as the system accumulates more data.

Though it seems that way, the Skin Memory service isn't really designed to be used individually though. Fujitsu plans to have the actual service catered to other skin care-related business entities (health, beauty, cosmetics, etc.) as a B2B service. For example, businesses who have signed contracts with them may combine the Skin Memory service with other services that they might have.

Fujitsu started the service on November 29, 2012.

Source: Tech-On (JP)