Montecito will sport SpeedStep, a technology first deployed in notebooks that
slows down a chip during lull periods to cut power. The chip will also contain a
complementary technology called Foxton that will speed things up during peak
periods. Overall, Montecito will consume about 20 percent less power than
current Itanium 2 chips. The chip will likely be connected to the rest of the
system with a 667MHz bus and run at about 2GHz. Some large Montecito machines
will also contain multiple buses, an approach designed to free up the data
traffic jams that can occur in 16- and 32-processor machines.

Other enhancements to Montecito include multithreading, ability to process 4
applications simultaneously, compared with only one for current Itaniums. The
multithreading benefit coming in Montecito will give the chip a performance
boost of about 10 percent to 20 percent. Tukwila, the Montecito successor coming
in 2007, will sport these same features but contain more processor cores and
probably other enhancements. Montecito will have two cores, while Tukwila will
have at least four, with plans for up to 16. Budget versions of Tukwila will be
able to fit into cheaper Xeon servers.

Montecito will sport SpeedStep, a technology first deployed in notebooks that
slows down a chip during lull periods to cut power. The chip will also contain a
complementary technology called Foxton that will speed things up during peak
periods. Overall, Montecito will consume about 20 percent less power than
current Itanium 2 chips. The chip will likely be connected to the rest of the
system with a 667MHz bus and run at about 2GHz. Some large Montecito machines
will also contain multiple buses, an approach designed to free up the data
traffic jams that can occur in 16- and 32-processor machines.

Other enhancements to Montecito include multithreading, ability to process 4
applications simultaneously, compared with only one for current Itaniums. The
multithreading benefit coming in Montecito will give the chip a performance
boost of about 10 percent to 20 percent. Tukwila, the Montecito successor coming
in 2007, will sport these same features but contain more processor cores and
probably other enhancements. Montecito will have two cores, while Tukwila will
have at least four, with plans for up to 16. Budget versions of Tukwila will be
able to fit into cheaper Xeon servers.

Pellston technology, which will be inside Montecito, will allow a computer to
kill malfunctioning sections of a chip’s cache, a pool of memory embedded in the
chip, and continue to use the chip. Silverdale technology, meanwhile, will help
boost the performance of existing virtualization software which lets a computer
run several operating systems in different partitions. A later version arriving
with Tukwila will expand to include more sophisticated partitioning technology
of its own.