Benchmarking company says it had “strong evidence” of rule breaking and delisting was used as a “last resort” after all else failed.

螢幕快照-2013-11-26-下午9.07.28

Futuremark recently delisted a number of Samsung and HTC phones from its popular mobile benchmarking app because it caught the manufacturers trying to game results.

Last week Futuremark announced that a number of devices had been delisted, with Futuremark’s president, Oliver Baltuch, only stating that a device must run Futuremark’s benchmarks if they were any other app — without modification. Baltuch was short on details, but mentioned that the strict rules were in place to preserve the integrity of the benchmark’s results.

Now a Futuremark public relations manager has expanded on why Samsung and HTC’s devices were delisted.

“The Samsung and HTC delisted models are breaking our rules,” Futuremark’s Marcella Ho said to VR-Zone in an emailed statement. “The key point is that a device must not detect the running of the benchmark, nor can it modify the behavior of the device as a result of that detection. A device must run 3DMark as if it was any other application.”

Ho explained that with the delisted devices the CPU’s clockspeed jumps to the maximum frequency when 3DMark is open and stays there until the app is closed, which doesn’t happen when other apps are opened on the infringing device.

“We also tested each device with a renamed, but otherwise identical, version of the 3DMark app,” Ho said. “When testing with the renamed app, the CPU frequency did not go to max and the test scores were lower.”

 “These are clear cases of the devices detecting the benchmark, which is why they have been delisted,” she said.

Samsung did not return requests for comment. HTC spokesperson Laura Kao said HTC has no comment.