Generally, the A10 is a responsive phone when not playing Angry Bird, and even then the retardation only comes in when the stage demands high CPU counts, birds and pigs and who knows what. The generous amount of ram provided in this phone is a blessing, as things only start feeling sluggish when you really open lots of application and leave them hanging to dry for at least one day. But then again, there is nothing a task manager can’t do or recover the precious megabytes of ram for you.

Calls-wise, other than the unfortunate placement of the microphone that may cause some disturbance to some right-handed users, it can be considered as receptive. Voice received on the other end of the phone call is commented to be clear and quiet, little background noise is captured; and more importantly, when on speaker mode, the reception of voices is superb even when in a noisy car (nope, being the law abiding person that I am, I did not make any phone calls while driving).

On the topic of driving, the GPS function of the lovely Garmin-ASUS sure came in handy and in fact more than handy. The lock on is fast even on a cold start, though the assisted GPS also played a part. After the cold start, locking on to the signal is almost instantaneous. The Garmin GPS software is just a dear, be it looking for petrol station, or looking for the nearest eatery, the software is able to just search about anything.

IMG 5620 Garmin Asus Android Power: nuvifone A10 and A50 Review

Lastly, be forewarned, if using the A10 as both a GPS and phone, please use the car dock with car charger. The battery when on this combo drains pretty fast, though this is not to be unexpected. With minimal or no usage of GPS (yes you can turn off the GPS), the A10 lasts about one and half day on 3G network with light data surfing and calls. Battery drains in proportion to the amount and intensity of application/data/voice usages.