113a Genius Rolls Out Battery Free Wireless Mouse

Finally, freedom from wires, and bulky wireless mice. If there's one thing repulsive about wireless mice, it's probably the pair of AA or AAA size batteries running in them. Some higher-end mice use a lighter lithium ion battery, but that considerably steps up costs. Genius worked its way around the weight and price issues with a light capacitor taking the place of a battery. This capacitor needs charging every week, but it gets charged in 3 minutes flat. Genius implemented the capacitor-powered wireless mouse design in the DX Eco.

Finally, freedom from wires, and bulky wireless mice. If there's one thing repulsive about wireless mice, it's probably the pair of AA or AAA size batteries running in them. Some higher-end mice use a lighter lithium ion battery, but even that isn't light enough. Genius worked its way around the weight issue with a light capacitor taking the place of a battery. This capacitor needs charging every week, but it gets charged in 3 minutes flat. Genius implemented the capacitor-powered wireless mouse design in the DX Eco. It weighs just 95 grams.

113a(1) Genius Rolls Out Battery Free Wireless Mouse

Measuring 110x 73 x 35 mm, this right-hand oriented wireless mouse uses 2.4 GHz wireless band for communicating with its compact USB reciever. A proprietary technology prevents radio interference. It uses a 1,600 DPI optical sensor, which can be tuned down to 800 DPI to conserve power and reduce sensitivity. Apart from its three main buttons, there are four more buttons, and a 2-way scroll wheel. The top side of the mouse is rubberized to enhance grip.

Backed by a 3-year warranty, the Genius DX-Eco is priced at US $49.99.