8  GIGABYTE GA G1975X + Presler Overclocking Test

According to GIGABYTE, the GIGABYTE G1-Turbo series motherboards
are designed for extreme overclockers and hardcore gamers. We have recently
gotten hold of a GIGABYTE GA-G1975X based on the Intel 975X Express chipset. We put it through some extreme overclocking tests to see if it lives up to it’s reputation…

According to GIGABYTE, the GIGABYTE G1-Turbo series motherboards
are designed for extreme overclockers and hardcore gamers. We have recently
gotten hold of a GIGABYTE GA-G1975X based on the Intel 975X Express chipset.

2  GIGABYTE GA G1975X + Presler Overclocking Test

This is one of the few GIGABYTE boards that come with GIGABYTE’s
proprietary Turbojet technology. If you haven’t already guessed it, Turboject
Technology refers to the dual blue LED air vents seen above. It provides more
room for performance tuning by improving the thermal conditions of two vital
areas, the MOSFETs around the CPU socket, and the motherboard chipset. Effectively,
the heat can be dissipated rapidly and efficiently from the CPU, north bridge
chipset, memory and the critical power management units. From personal testing,
it definitely does work quite well, unlike some of the gimmicks we see out there.
the main reason is that it not just has the fans to pull the hot air out from
the motherboard area, but also fans to push the air through the vital areas.

4  GIGABYTE GA G1975X + Presler Overclocking Test

The board features the overclocking software from GIGABYTE,
EasyTune. With it I can change FSB speed, PCI Express clocks , DRAM and CPU
voltages. One can also change multiplier with this software if your CPU supports
it, though a reboot is required. There was a slight bug with the DRAM voltage
reading when I set DDR2 voltage to 2.3v and above… the software keeps reading
2.2v. This board supports up to 2.5v DDR2 voltage and this is a great plus,
and a rarity among DDR2 boards. There is even temperature monitoring with this
software. I’m very pleased with it and found it very useful, though more options
such as “FSB/DRAM Ratio” would be have made it even better. And a
nicer looking interface… As seen above, there is a temperature reading discreprancy
when going down into the negatives… At around -90 degrees celcius, it reports
183 degrees celcius and gives a warning.