z77x ud5h Gigabytes 3D BIOS UEFI makes Hackintoshing a breeze

With rumours of Apple discontinuing its Mac Pro and potentially even more of its desktop Mac products in the future, building a DYI Hackintosh might very well be the only way to get a high-performance desktop Mac in the not too distant future. Details have emerged in the Hackingtosh community that it's easier than ever to create your own Hackintosh these days with a bit of help from Gigabyte's new 7-series motherboards with 3D BIOS UEFI.

With rumours of Apple discontinuing its Mac Pro and potentially even more of its desktop Mac products in the future, building a DYI Hackintosh might very well be the only way to get a high-performance desktop Mac in the not too distant future. Details have emerged in the Hackingtosh community that it's easier than ever to create your own Hackintosh these days with a bit of help from Gigabyte's new 7-series motherboards with 3D BIOS UEFI.

We're not actually talking about the 3D mode in the UEFI interface, but rather about some changes that Gigabyte have implemented with its move from BIOS to UEFI. Hackintosh website tonymacx86.com is reporting that the new Gigabyte motherboards have better support for OS X than any other motherboard currently available in the market.

Normally when you build a Hackingtosh you need something called a DSDT (Differentiated System Description Table) as this is how OS X can detect what kind of hardware you have in your system. Without a DSDT Hackintoshes tend to go into kernel panic mode, i.e. they're pretty much useless. Although there are plenty of readily available DSDT files on the internet these days, they might not be for the specific BIOS/UEFI version that you have installed on your motherboard and editing your own DSDT isn't for the faint of heart. However, the latest motherboards from Gigabyte don't appear to need a DSDT file for basic functionality, as the boards boot into OS X just fine without it.

Add to that the small fact that sleep and wake works without any additional fiddling and you have another eyesore for many Hackintosh builders sorted without any kind of hassle. It's not entirely clear what Gigabyte has done to make this work, but it's made the life of those wanting to install an alternative OS on their PC a lot easier. In comparison, some other motherboards with UEFI requires a special modified UEFI and considering that the company has started to lock down its UEFI to prevent unauthorized UEFI files from being flashed, there's a clear case for not going with them if you want a Hackintosh. Admittedly not all is rosy for Gigabyte either, as the VIA audio chips are poorly supported under OS X and only a few limited models features Realtek audio which has much better support by Apple's OS.

Source: tonymacx86