ga a75 d3h Gigabytes Llano motherboards arrive little early

We're still almost a week from AMD's desktop Llano launch, but the motherboard manufacturers are eager to show off their wares and so product pages start appearing. Gigabyte has put up a small selection of its total of 12 boards; at least if the earlier leak by Gigabyte Germany comes to pass. So let's take a closer look at what we can expect at least initially from Gigabyte.

We're still almost a week from AMD's desktop Llano launch, but the motherboard manufacturers are eager to show off their wares and so product pages start appearing. Gigabyte has put up a small selection of its total of 12 boards; at least if the earlier leak by Gigabyte Germany comes to pass. So let's take a closer look at what we can expect at least initially from Gigabyte.

The first four models are all based on AMD's A75 chipset and it makes a lot of sense for Gigabyte to get these boards out first. Two are full ATX boards in the shape of the GA-A75-UD4H which we've seen before and the GA-A75-D3H (also seen before) while the two mATX boards are the GA-A75M-UD2H, another board we've seen and the GA-A75M-D2H a board so far not seen.

 Also available at launch, but not as yet appearing on Gigabyte's website is the GA-A75-DS3P (ATX), GA-A75M-S2V (mATX) and GA-A75N-USB3 (mini ITX). As for Gigabyte's A55 boards we're just going to have to wait and see what happens.

We've already detailed the A75-UD4H twice before and nothing appears to have changed since we last saw the board. The only interesting note which should prove to be the same for all A75 boards is that only two DIMMs are supported when using 1866MHz memory, but considering how affordable 4GB DIMMs have become, this is unlikely to have much of an impact.

ga a75 ud4h Gigabytes Llano motherboards arrive little early

The A75-D3H also appears to have changed very little since the first pictures of the board appeared on the web and if any tweaks have been done, we can't spot them. Do note that the secondary x16 slot on this board only has four lanes worth of bandwidth.

ga a75 d3h Gigabytes Llano motherboards arrive little early

Things are pretty much the same for the A75M-UD2H, although here a few things have changed since our early look at the board before Computex. One of the PCI slots got swapped for a x1 PCI Express slot, but this is mostly useless if you install a graphics card with a dual slot cooler. The Etron USB 3.0 host controller is now gone and as such we're looking at a pair of USB 3.0 ports at the rear I/O being replaced by two USB 2.0 ports. On the upside the board gained a DisplayPort connector and in terms of irrelevant changes the PS/2 port is now below the USB ports instead of above them.

ga a75m ud2h Gigabytes Llano motherboards arrive little early

Finally we have the A75M-D2H which is the more affordable version of the A75M-UD2H which gets regular copper layers, no eSATA, although in favour for an additional internal SATA port and only two DIMM slots. Other things that are MIA include one internal USB 2.0 pin-header, FireWire, the parallel port pin-header, the DisplayPort, the MOSFET heatsink and half of the analogue audio jacks. At least Gigabyte left the optical S/PDIF and thanks to native chipset level support for USB 3.0 even this board has four USB 3.0 ports in total, two at the rear and two via a pin-header.

ga a75m d2h Gigabytes Llano motherboards arrive little early

All the new boards sports Gigabyte's Super4 features which consists of Super Safe, Super Speed, Super Savings and Super Sound. You can read more about the specifics of these features over at Gigabyte's website, as we want to focus this article on a slightly different point that Gigabyte is making in its marketing materials, namely performance.

On as much as no-one's expecting rip-roaring CPU performance from AMDs upcoming APU's, the graphics part is what will set AMD apart from the competition, i.e. Intel. Gigabyte has been busy pushing its motherboards to see how fast they can make them go and they've got all the components plugged into them running a fair bit faster than AMD intended. As such they've managed to break P6000 points in 3DMark Vantage using just the integrated graphics.

gigabyte a75 Gigabytes Llano motherboards arrive little early

This was done with the A75M-UD2H motherboard, an A8-3850 APU at 3.77GHz using air cooling on a 145MHz bus speed with the IGP at 870MHz and the DDR3 memory at 2,320MHz. Considering that at stock speed the same APU is somewhere in the mid 3000's that's a pretty impressive result. What will be interesting to see is how well an overclocked APU would work in AMD Radeon Dual Graphics mode, or Hybrid CrossFire as most of us knows it. It seems like AMD's Llano platform might very well end up being the choice of budget conscious gamers, but we'll reserve judgement until we've tested it for ourselves.

Source: Gigabyte