Intel and server partners plan to launch the "Nocona" version of the Xeon
processor for dual-processor servers but a supporting chip called "Lindenhurst"
that handles input-output chores has a flaw that in rare circumstances can
cripple the computer. The problem means Intel will recommend against using
adapter cards that plug into servers with the new PCI Express communications
technology. The problem is expected to be fixed in an updated version of
Lindenhurst arriving in the fourth quarter.

Meanwhile, customers thinking of buying the new servers–the first with Intel
chips that support 64-bit extensions–will be able to use the older PCI-X
input-output slots or use adapters that have been certified not to be affected
by the glitch. The problem in the Lindenhurst chipse affects a component called
the memory controller hub, can cause the input-output system to become
unresponsive. It affects only PCI Express plug-in cards, not PCI Express
technology that’s built directly into a server’s motherboard.

Intel and server partners plan to launch the "Nocona" version of the Xeon
processor for dual-processor servers but a supporting chip called "Lindenhurst"
that handles input-output chores has a flaw that in rare circumstances can
cripple the computer. The problem means Intel will recommend against using
adapter cards that plug into servers with the new PCI Express communications
technology. The problem is expected to be fixed in an updated version of
Lindenhurst arriving in the fourth quarter.

Meanwhile, customers thinking of buying the new servers–the first with Intel
chips that support 64-bit extensions–will be able to use the older PCI-X
input-output slots or use adapters that have been certified not to be affected
by the glitch. The problem in the Lindenhurst chipse affects a component called
the memory controller hub, can cause the input-output system to become
unresponsive. It affects only PCI Express plug-in cards, not PCI Express
technology that’s built directly into a server’s motherboard.