Google disagrees with pornography blocking measures

 Google disagrees with pornography blocking measures

Google disagrees with UK proposals that will force users to tell their ISP that they want to look at pornography online, labelling the move as a “mistake.”

Google disagrees with UK proposals that will force users to tell their ISP that they want to look at pornography online, labelling the move as a “mistake.”

 
The idea is designed to protect children from adult content, but Google's head of Public Policy, Sarah Hunter, said that Google prefers educating adults on how to protect their children, rather than employing technical measures that block content. She said the latter would be a “simple solution” that would deskill parents, which could lead to “very difficult territory.”
 
One UK ISP, TalkTalk, has already introduced an option that allows parents to filter out adult content on a network level, but the UK government is considering whether or not to make such a blocking mechanism the default for all internet users in the country.
 
 Google disagrees with pornography blocking measures
 
TalkTalk's executive director of strategy, Andrew Heaney, said the company's approach was not about censorship, as it gave users the choice to turn the filter on or off. He criticised the idea of having the filter on by default, however, labelling it a “slippery slope” that would lead to a “dangerous world.”
 
Kirsty Hughes from the Index on Censorship criticised the entire idea, asking why legal content was being blocked and who decides what goes on the blacklists. “This is a form of censorship,” she said.
 
The Open Rights Group found that a large number of websites were being wrongly blocked by similar adult content filters on mobile networks, including blogs, community websites and political commentary, which raises big questions over the neutrality and reliability of any blocking mechanism.
 
Of course, a far more logical solution is for parents to look after their own children and what content they are exposed to, rather than relying on ISPs or internet firms to do it for them.
 
Source: BBC