googlefiber Google launches 100 times faster broadband service

Google has launched a broadband service that it claims is 100 times faster than the average speeds experienced by most internet users.

Google has launched a broadband service that it claims is 100 times faster than the average speeds experienced by most internet users.

 
The jack of all trades company is rolling out Google Fiber to lucky users in Kansas City, Missouri, who will benefit from speeds of up to 1,000Mb per second. To put that into perspective, the highest speed in Ireland at the moment is 120Mb, with many users stuck on an a paltry 8 Mb line.
 
For someone upgrading from a 10Mb line, the speed difference could mean it will only take 3 seconds to download 100 photos, compared to 4 minutes and 40 seconds, 3 seconds to download 100 songs, compared to 5 minutes 28 seconds, and 7 seconds to download a high-definition movie, compared to 10 minutes and 56 seconds.
 
googlefiber Google launches 100 times faster broadband service
 
The service also comes with additional features, with the internet service also doubling as a TV package, allowing not only YouTube and Netflix, but hundreds of high-definition TV channels. There will also be the ability to record eight TV shows at the same time, with 2TB of storage available.
 
There will be limited availability to begin with, however. Users in an area will need to pre-register with Google for $10 and encourage others in their area to do the same. On 9 September Google will select the “fiberhoods” with the most desire for high-speed internet to install first. The service will likely be rolled out to more areas, however, once it meets with more support. 
 
The subscription cost to get the 1,000Mb line from Google is $70/month or $120/month with the TV package, but local schools and hospitals will be given the service for free. A free 5Mb service will also be offered to ensure that everyone in an area has internet access, though a $300 construction free is initially required. This fee is waived for subscribers to either of the two higher packages.