Google has registered a large number of top-level domain names, including trademarks like .google, names relating to core business products like .docs, and stranger choices like .lol.

Google has registered a large number of top-level domain names, including trademarks like .google, names relating to core business products like .docs, and stranger choices like .lol.

 
Most websites use fairly generic domain extensions, like .com, which accounts for nearly 50 percent of websites out there. Other popular ones include .net, .org, and ones that relate to the country of origin, such as .co.uk for the UK and .sg or .com.sg for Singapore.
 
Domain registry firm ICANN has introduced a program where a wider variety of words can be used for these top-level domains. Google is one of the first major technology business to jump on this bandwagon, dividing domain registrations into four main categories: trademarks (.google), core business domains (.docs), user experience improvement domains (.youtube), and “interesting and creative” domains (.lol).
 
 
The problem with some of these is that they make domain names longer to type and could end up causing confusion for finding websites. For example, does Google plan to have google.google or youtube.youtube? We expect not, but it may use its new acquisitions to make it known what its products are, so instead of google.com/music, it might be music.google.
 
The fourth category is interesting, as it could give Google a bit of a monopoly on generic internet terms, like the “laugh out loud” acronym “lol” that it registered. What it plans to use this and similar  domain extensions for is anyone's guess.
 
Google has promised that security and abuse prevention are a high priority with these new top-level domains, and it will work with all ICANN-accredited registrars and brand owners to develop rights protection mechanisms.
 
“We’re just beginning to explore this potential source of innovation on the web, and we are curious to see how these proposed new TLDs will fare in the existing TLD environment,” said Vint Cerf, Chief Internet Evangelist for Google and one of the fathers of the internet. “By opening up more choices for Internet domain names, we hope people will find options for more diverse—and perhaps shorter—signposts in cyberspace.