googlenexus Google unveils Nexus 7 tablet, Nexus Q music device, Google Glass, and Siri busting Google Now

Google has unveiled the Nexus 7 Android tablet, the Nexus Q music device, Google Glass for consumers, and a Siri-like Android service called Google Now, making the search giant's I/O event this year jam-packed with exciting announcements.

Google has unveiled the Nexus 7 Android tablet, the Nexus Q music device, Google Glass for consumers, and a Siri-like Android service called Google Now, making the search giant's I/O event this year jam-packed with exciting announcements.

 
Nexus 7
 
The company showcased the Nexus 7, its 7-inch Android-powered tablet computer with a 1280x-800 pixel high-definition display, a Tegra-3 chipset, quad-core CPU, 12-core GPU, and a dirt cheap price tag starting at just $199, with a release date of mid-July in the US, UK, Canada and Australia. The low price is for an 8GB model, with a 16GB version available for $249.
 
Google is hoping to entice multimedia buffs of all kinds by preloading the Nexus 7 with the film Transformers: Dark of the Moon, the book The Bourne Dominion, magazines like Condé Nast Traveler and Popular Science, and music from bands including Coldplay and the Rolling Stones. There is also $25 free credit provided on Google Play for a limited time.
 
Not everyone is impressed with the announcement, however. Jan Dawson, chief telecommunications analyst at Ovum, criticised Google's approach, suggesting the tablet would not be sustainable long-term, due to subsidising of the cost to keep the price down, and that Google has failed to address problems with Android for tablets, such as the sparsity of tablet-sized apps. Of course, more success in the tablet market for Google will result in more developers flocking to this area, so this may not be a major problem.
 
 
Nexus Q
 
Those looking for a less mobile device for music may enjoy the Nexus Q, an unusually-designed home entertainment sphere, which plugs into speakers or a TV and allows streaming of music from Google Play. With a price-tag of $299, however, it is more expensive than Google's new tablet and does less things, so consumers may not be as enamoured by it as interior designers appear to be. It will ship in mid-July as well.
 
 
Google Glass
 
It was only a few short months ago when Google unveiled a new research project to develop augmented-reality glasses, but a mock demo of its features had fans salivating and throwing their wallets at Google employees in anticipation.
 
The company is now going beyond merely a “what if” scenario, with the only questions remaining being “when?” and “how much?” Google is hoping to have a version of the glasses ready for public consumption within two years, with a price tag expected to be drastically lower than its existing developer cost of a pricey $1,500.
 
The glasses are effectively a smartphone on your head, albeit without a phone network, allowing users to see, hear and speak in a semi-android experience. The company hopes to bring a Google Maps experience to the glasses, among a variety of other features shown in the demo.
 
If none of that was impressive, some Google Glass-wearing skydivers almost stole the show.
 
Google Now
 
If you were won over by the sweet nothings whispered in your ear by Siri, you might want to consider cheating with a certain little green robot. As part of the Android Jelly Bean offering, Google announced a new service called Google Now. As the name implies, it's all about getting information to the user immediately, and so it mimics many of the offerings of Siri, such as finding the score of a sports match or locating a nearby restaurant.
 
That is all pretty standard fair, but where Google Now differs, and potentially wins out, is that it seeks out information before you even ask it. When you leave your house it looks for traffic updates. When you go to a restaurant it checks the menu and recommends the top-rated choices. So instead of having an electronic friend who will answer your questions, you have an electronic friend who will make suggestions and pre-empt your actions.