Google’s Eric Schmidt says internet helps shape government

eric schmidt Googles Eric Schmidt says internet helps shape government

The internet is many things, and politics is just another sector the internet encompasses.  Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt feels even more strongly about how the internet has not only influenced the delivery of news in politics but also how it has helped shaped the governments of its users.

tunisia revolution protest Googles Eric Schmidt says internet helps shape government

The internet is many things, and politics is just another sector the internet encompasses.  Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt feels even more strongly about how the internet has not only influenced the delivery of news in politics but also how it has helped shaped the governments of its users. 

In a recent speech, at the Google Big Tent Conference in Europe, Schmidt proclaimed that the internet has made it harder for oppressive governments to censor people’s beliefs and opinions.

Schmidt made his case by pointing out the revolutions that occurred in Tunisia had the internet written all over it, because the government wasn’t able to censor people’s views on the rough dictator policies.

“You can understand Tunisia’s revolution as a failure of the dictator to censor the internet.  It’s very difficult for governments that are autocratic to operate when populations are against them,” Schmidt pointed out the type of tyranny that the internet has helped oppose. 

He went further to add, “The solution is openness and transparency in government and connectivity for the individual.”  Which he believes the internet can provide for if people want a democracy. 

In the broad scope of things, the topic of the internet molding any government system can be broken down into many levels.  Google does not represent the internet, although its brand has a big part to do with it. 

You and I, alike, are just bits of electronic data that are transferred from wire to wire and servers to servers.  We do not hold any significance in terms of individual priority while we are on the internet.  What we are, as collective, is the present preferred method for the sharing of ideas—which in turn reflects what the internet is. 

Schmidt makes a good point in proclaiming that the internet has the power to help people of oppressed governments overcome its tyranny through information.  Sadly, the reality is that tyranny exists even in the presence of the great internet revolution. 

Source: telegraph.co.uk

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