cyber crime Governments not spending enough on putting cyber criminals behind bars

A recent study conducted through a partnership between the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, and USA revealed that governments spent more money on fighting cybercrimes through software rather than allocating more money into arresting the people behind those crimes.

cyber crime Governments not spending enough on putting cyber criminals behind bars

A recent study conducted through a partnership between the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, and USA revealed that governments spent more money on fighting cybercrimes through software rather than allocating more money into arresting the people behind those crimes.

According to the BBC, the colleagues working on the study considered all “main types of cybercrime”, which includes “online payment and banking fraud”.

The study found out that governments spend less than £10 million out of £640 million annually on putting people carrying out online crimes behind bars.  Misallocation of funds led authorities to concentrate more on surveillance rather than actually going after suspects. 

“Some police forces believe the problem is too large to tackle,” Ross Anderson, lead author of the study, told the BBC. “In fact, a small number of gangs lie behind many incidents and locking them up would be far more effective than telling the public to fit an anti-phishing toolbar or purchase anti-virus software. Cybercrooks impose disproportionate costs on society.”

Anderson compares cybercrime to a swamp, stating that the only way to clean it up is to drain it by arresting the crooks.  He credits, however, the FBI for doing most of the “heavy lifting” when it comes to actually going after online criminals. 

Anderson’s solutions to the uneven allocation of funds to different areas of cybercrimes management is simple, make it even.  Furthermore, he believes that legislations that protect online consumers should be on the governments’ agenda.  Online payment and banking fraud has led many to avoid online transactions altogether, therefore, indirectly affecting the economy.  

Source: bbc.co.uk