Hands on: Gran Turismo 6 Demo at E3, a G27 wheel is recommended

Polyphony Digital’s Gran Turismo 6 might be one of the last few legitimate titles the PlayStation 3 will have the honor of running.  Before the title launches later this year, however, we had the opportunity to test drive the game at this year’s 2013 Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3).  Read on and check out our impression of Kazunori Yamauchi’s latest vision for the iconic racing simulator franchise!

Gran Turismo, like any other popular franchises, evolved over time to adapt new hardware functionalities.  Many casual gamers will get by with just a regular gamepad, but for enthusiasts, it will take some extra add-ons to fully experience the designer’s intended mechanics of the game.

Unlike the majority of other console-based demo booths at E3, the Gran Turismo 6 booth was decked out with around a dozen cockpits with GT wheels and paddles ready for play.  The game’s menu is very much similar to that of previous installments of GT. Like the quiet before a storm, selecting the game mode, track, and car comes with great ease, but all that feeling of calmness get instantly shattered once you begin to rev up your engine and get out of first gear.

As advertised, Gran Turismo 6 has once again gotten it done when it comes to delivering the realistic feel of taking a car out to the track.  Through the use of the GT wheel and paddles, every bumps and turns got realistic amounts of feedback depending on how fast you’re going, how you break, and how your car is positioned.

The basics of driving a car won’t change, but the subtle differences in how various cars feel and handle will definitely get the adrenaline of any enthusiasts going.  “The Real Racing Simulator,” as every GT installment strives to be, is—in our humble opinion—once again apparent in the latest GT.

GT6 isn’t ‘something like’ Need for Speed or GRID, and that’s all any casual gamers need to know if they’re curious about the game.  For car enthusiasts and racers without licenses, GT6 will deliver essentially the same experience as GT5 (provided you have the right add-ons [i.e. **Logitech’s G27 set-up]), but with newer cars, promises better rendering and of faster load time.

**The biggest drawback to any legitimate racing simulator is that a quality wheel and paddle setup is required.  Logitech’s G27 is one of the more popular sets out there, and with a price tag of nearly $300, the G27 is often considered an unnecessary peripheral.