Hardware components in short supply after Japanese earthquake

supply Hardware components in short supply after Japanese earthquake

Any you planning to indulge in any high-cost, IT-related purchases such as television sets, smartphones and PCs any time soon? If so, be prepared to fork out more cash for that product which you have had your eye on for the longest time: the components needed for the assembly of such devices are reportedly in short supply, no thanks to the recent quake which ravaged Japan and its factories.

supply Hardware components in short supply after Japanese earthquake

Have you been eyeing that shiny, new LCD television set, notebook PC, tablet PC or smartphone that has been sitting on the display shelves of your favourite hardware or computer shop for the longest time already? Well, we got some advice for you: you can either break the piggy bank and get that device while it is still available, or give it a miss altogether and put that money into the bank instead. 

Why? Well, the truth hurts, but it seems that the recent earthquake that trashed Japan around has had a much greater impact on the country than just destroying towns and taking out its nuclear reactors. Apparently, an article posted by IDG claims that major electronics manufacturers such as Samsung and LG Electronics are reporting shortages in the components needed to manufacture the display panels used in the aforementioned devices "due to blackouts and transport issues". As display panels are one of the most important components that make up such devices, it is highly possible that such shortages will result in consumers having to pay higher prices for such products.

In addition, it appears that display panels are not the only components affected by the natural disaster. Toshiba has reportedly claimed that the earthquake and the rolling blackouts imposed on the power grid has left its silicon wafer fabrication factory out of commision, and this is expected to have an adverse effect on NAND flash memory chips heavily used in smartphones and tablet PCs.

Simply put, the earthquake in Japan has thrown the country's entire supply chain in to disarray, and there is a very high likelihood for global consumers to start feeling the aftereffects of the natural disaster in the form of increased prices for existing consumer electronic products. Of course, whether this will actually happen will depend on how quickly Japan can restore shipment of supplies needed for the manufacturing and assembly of such devices, but until then, we might all want to start preparing to pay more for our digital needs.

Source: IDG news via Techland

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