Cook calls new Apple expose ‘nonsense’ but author says it  ‘must have touched a nerve’ in the company.’

apple new book Haunted Empire proves to be controversial among Apple execs

Passages from this book, Haunted Empire: Apple After Steve Jobs, have been making headlines over the past week. Written by former Wall Street Journal Apple reporter Yukari Iwatani Kane, it looks at the company’s struggle for survival after the demise of its co-founder and former CEO Steve Jobs.

One headline that this book managed to create dealt with Steve Jobs’ reported disgust with the television market. Rumors have been circulating for a few years now that the company may be looking to enter the TV market with a full fledged HDTV set. Apparently at a top 100 meeting in 2010, when asked, Steve Jobs told employees that Apple won’t go down this road, “horrible” is what he is believed to have called the global TV market. But that’s in the past, Cook has been at the helm for the better part of three years, and one can’t surely expect him to mirror his predecessor completely.

Kane goes to great lengths in the book to describe the differences between the two CEOs, painting a rather solemn picture depicting Apple like a ship lost without its longtime captain. That seems to have struck Cook’s nerve. In an email to CNBC, Cook brands the book as “nonsense” and reiterates his confidence in the company, as he has done so on many occasions in the past.

“This nonsense belongs with some of the other books I’ve read about Apple, it fails to capture Apple, Steve, or anyone else in the company,” he said. “We’ve always had many doubters in our history, they only make us stronger.”

On the other hand, Kane believes that for Cook to have such strong feelings about this book, “it must have touched a nerve.” She goes on to say that even she was surprised by the conclusions, so she can understand the sentiment. Kane says that she is happy to speak with Cook or anyone else at Apple in public or private. She says her hope in writing this book was to start a though-provoking conversation. Well, it did get Cook to speak out, even if against the book.

Source: Re/Code