Don’t Bring Your Work Home 44 How Samsung S III engineers kept their work under wrap

A company’s flagship product development should always be treated as if it’s the heart of the company, and any leaks essentially rips apart the company’s most important organ—and in turn, tremendous monetary loss.  The time frame leading up to the release of the Samsung Galaxy S III were filled with legitimate info leaks, but also some outrageous speculations.  In a recent post on Samsung’s official blog site, the S III R&D team revealed how they were able to keep the S III’s R&D on the down low while maintaining their sanity in spite of the chaos around them.

Don’t Bring Your Work Home 44(1) How Samsung S III engineers kept their work under wrap

A company’s flagship product development should always be treated as if it’s the heart of the company, and any leaks essentially rips apart the company’s most important organ—and in turn, tremendous monetary loss.  The time frame leading up to the release of the Samsung Galaxy S III were filled with legitimate info leaks, but also some outrageous speculations.  In a recent post on Samsung’s official blog site, the S III R&D team revealed how they were able to keep the S III’s R&D on the down low while maintaining their sanity in spite of the chaos around them.

The S III R&D team basically lived a double life; a top secret S III life and a life outside of the S III.  It was quite obvious that the family of the S III R&D teams knew of the team’s work, and, more often than not, the team was asked directly by members of their family about the S III.

Don’t Bring Your Work Home 2 How Samsung S III engineers kept their work under wrap

“I got so many questions about the GALAXY S III from my friends and family.  By I’d say ‘don’t ask me or you’ll get me fired.  I told them to check it out after it was officially made public,” said Senior Engineer Young Doo Jin. 

Byung Joon Lee, S III mechanical engineer, added, “My eldest son is in the 6th grade.  He knew that I had worked on the GALAXY S and S II.  So I guess he assumed that I’d do S III also.  Every time he saw an article on the internet about the GALAXY S II he’d ask ‘Dad!  You’re making the SIII, right?’  But all I could say was ‘I don’t really know.’  It was really awkward.”

Senior engineer, Yong Min Ha, simply avoided speaking to his family about work completely. 

“I love my wife and my adorable kids.  But I just never told them about my job from the beginning.  Haha,” he said humorously. 

Outside of family inquiries, the team members had to take discuss the S III’s progress with people outside of the team through verbal arrangements only—meaning, no pictures or drawings of any sorts were used.  This made it especially difficult when the team had to present prototypes to partners and suppliers. 

“Because we were only permitted to see the products and others weren’t. We had to explain the GALAXY S III with all sorts of words. The Procurement Department had to set a price for the GALAXY S III and purchase the materials based on our verbal explanations. It was hard for everyone I guess.  Hahaha,” Byung Joon Lee explained. 

Don’t Bring Your Work Home 33 How Samsung S III engineers kept their work under wrap

During the prototype building stage, the team had to make three different prototypes in a given time frame to avoid design leaks.  For instance, a team member working on the antenna design had to make several antennas, and all of which had to be different for each of the prototypes.

“Generally, we manufacture the antenna based on the final design and request for authorization,” Senior Engineer Beoung Sun Lee said.  “However, for security reasons, we had to make the antenna over and over.  We had to come up with a new antenna every time the new design came out.  To be honest, it was quite tiring and frustrating.”

To cut down on the time outside of their workbenches, the team members often resorted to helicopters to get from one place to another.  Talk about a roller coaster—helicopter rides in the S III team’s case—ride for these engineers.  Apparently, some of the engineers at Samsung are well paid tech-secret agents.

Source: samsungtomorrow.com