Human-controlled car beats self-driving car in race

cars Human controlled car beats self driving car in race

Self-driving cars are becoming a growing phenomenon, touted by many as a safer way to travel, but when it comes to racing, humans still have the upper hand – for now.

Self-driving cars are becoming a growing phenomenon, touted by many as a safer way to travel, but when it comes to racing, humans still have the upper hand – for now.

 
The race was held at the Thunderhill Raceway in California, with an automated Audi TTS developed by the Centre for Automotive Research at Standford University facing off against a human driver.
 
There were 15 turns on the track, presenting a challenge for the robotic car which adjusts to surroundings thanks to a number of sensors fitted to it, and the driverless car reached speeds of 115 miles per hour.
 
In the end the human driver won, but only by a few seconds, suggesting that it is likely only a matter of time before robotic racers beat us to the finish line.
 
cars Human controlled car beats self driving car in race
 
The experiment will be pivotal to future development of self-driving technology, with the researchers at Stanford analysing data collected from the race, including from human drivers, in order to incorporate better controls into the car.
 
The ultimate aim is to take what is learned and developed from this research and bring it into safety systems for cars, particularly for dealing with unpredictable scenarios like icy roads. Google has already been boasting about the safety of its self-driving cars, explaining that most crashes are caused by human error, while Nissan is developing similar driverless technology.
 
“As we set up these systems in the future, it's important not to build autonomous vehicles that are merely a collection of systems designed for human support but to think a little bit more holistically about making them as good as the very best human drivers,” said Professor Chris Gerdes of Stanford University. “It's not so much the technology as the capability of the human that is our inspiration now.”
 
Source: BBC