Experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plan to visit the Fukushima I nuclear plant to evaluate once again the decommissioning plans that are going underway.

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Japan’s Fukushima power plant is under the microscope again, this time by a team of experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency.

This team plans to begin reviewing decommissioning plans that was presented and executed a few years back by the country’s utility operator TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company). Technically considered as a follow-up to the previous pre-review that was done by the IAEA last April, the review primarily includes a comprehensive examination of the efficiency of TEPCO’s overall decommissioning efforts. This is to determine whether the plans should be continued, and to see whether or not the results would indeed be as they intended.

From November 25 to December 4, the 19-man IAEA evaluation team will be tracing the steps taken by TEPCO and the Japanese government since the start of the decommissioning process. They would analyze the measures that they have taken throughout the time period between the meltdown of the reactor itself last 2011 up to today. More specifically however, the analysis would primarily focus on the efforts made to contain the contaminated water around the disabled reactors, as well as the removal and disposal of spent fuel at Fukushima’s reactor no. 4.

Needless to say, even the first steps of the decommissioning process would take a very long time to complete. Reports say that it would take at least a few decades, given the dangers and risks presented in the operations required.

Source: Yomiuri News (JP), Japan Daily Press, Wikimedia Commons