IBM on Monday will introduce its first Power5-based iSeries models, the i5
520, with one or two processors, and the i5 570, with one to four processors.
IBM’s Power5 chip is a 64-bit processor that competes with high-end chips from
Intel, Sun and HP. Later models will accommodate as many as 64 processors, with
each processor able to execute simultaneously two instruction sequences called
"threads."

Power5 has better partition abilities than Power4, with each chip able to run
as many as 10 separate operating systems instead of just one. That feature is
handy for companies that want to consolidate several standalone machines that
spend much of their time idling into a single server that’s more efficiently
used. The first i5 520 and 570 products will be generally available June 11.
Then, in the third quarter, IBM is expected to introduce a new midrange model
for cost-conscious buyers, the i5 550, with as many as four processors. Also at
that time, the stacking of four-processor modules used in the i5 570 will extend
that system to a 16-processor size.

IBM on Monday will introduce its first Power5-based iSeries models, the i5
520, with one or two processors, and the i5 570, with one to four processors.
IBM’s Power5 chip is a 64-bit processor that competes with high-end chips from
Intel, Sun and HP. Later models will accommodate as many as 64 processors, with
each processor able to execute simultaneously two instruction sequences called
"threads."

Power5 has better partition abilities than Power4, with each chip able to run
as many as 10 separate operating systems instead of just one. That feature is
handy for companies that want to consolidate several standalone machines that
spend much of their time idling into a single server that’s more efficiently
used. The first i5 520 and 570 products will be generally available June 11.
Then, in the third quarter, IBM is expected to introduce a new midrange model
for cost-conscious buyers, the i5 550, with as many as four processors. Also at
that time, the stacking of four-processor modules used in the i5 570 will extend
that system to a 16-processor size.

The new servers incorporate technology called Hypervisor, lower-level
software and hardware drawn from the mainframe line that handles tasks such as
allocating memory and network resources to different partitions. Accompanying
Hypervisor is interdomain networking, in which one partition on a server can
communicate with another at much faster speeds than with an ordinary Ethernet
network. The i5 line also comes with technology called Integrated xSeries Server
(IXS) that tightly binds an Intel-based server that can share the main server’s
networking resources. With i5, though, IXS technology now supports Linux as well
as Microsoft Windows.