IBM today announced that the microprocessors that will serve as the digital heartbeat of Nintendo’s upcoming Wii™ video game console are being shipped from IBM’s state-of-the-art East Fishkill, N.Y., fabrication facility. Earlier this year, IBM and Nintendo signed a multi-year microchip production agreement to support the upcoming launch of Nintendo’s eagerly anticipated Wii video game console. The chip, code-named “Broadway,” will deliver experiences not previously possible on video game consoles. Under the terms of the agreement, IBM will produce millions of fully tested, Power Architecture-based chips featuring IBM Silicon on Insulator (SOI) technology at 90 nanometers (90 billionths of a meter), based on the specifications of the custom design agreement previously agreed upon by the two companies. The chip is being produced at IBM’s state-of-the-art 300mm semiconductor development and manufacturing facility in East Fishkill, N.Y.

IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced that the microprocessors that will serve as
the digital heartbeat of Nintendo’s upcoming Wii™ video game console are being
shipped from IBM’s state-of-the-art East Fishkill, N.Y., fabrication facility.

Earlier this year, IBM and Nintendo signed a multi-year microchip production
agreement to support the upcoming launch of Nintendo’s eagerly anticipated Wii
video game console. The chip, code-named “Broadway,” will deliver experiences
not previously possible on video game consoles.

“The first chips are in our possession,” said Genyo Takeda, Senior Managing
Director/General Manager, Integrated Research & Development Division, Nintendo
Co., Ltd. “Today’s milestone marks the final stage of our drive to reach both
core and nontraditional gamers with an inviting, inclusive and remarkable gaming
experience.”

Under the terms of the agreement, IBM will produce millions of fully tested,
Power Architecture-based chips featuring IBM Silicon on Insulator (SOI)
technology at 90 nanometers (90 billionths of a meter), based on the
specifications of the custom design agreement previously agreed upon by the two
companies. The chip is being produced at IBM’s state-of-the-art 300mm
semiconductor development and manufacturing facility in East Fishkill, N.Y.

Silicon on Insulator technology from IBM helps deliver to Nintendo a generous
improvement in processing power while achieving a 20 percent reduction in energy
consumption.

Microchips based on the Power Architecture are the electronic brain of devices
large and small, and are inside automotive safety systems, printers, routers,
servers and the world’s most powerful supercomputers.

"The IBM team has worked hard to design, develop and deliver this customized
Power microprocessor for the worldwide launch of Nintendo’s new system,” said
Ron Martino, director, IBM Technology Collaboration Solutions. “When millions of
gamers take the controls of Wii this holiday season, the IBM logo will once
again be front and center on this innovative new product.”

The relationship between IBM and Nintendo dates to May 1999, when IBM announced
a comprehensive technology agreement to design and manufacture the central
microprocessor, often referred to as the “Gekko” chip, for the Nintendo GameCube™
system from its Burlington, Vt., production facility.

IBM’s Technology Collaboration Solutions unit helps clients collaborate with IBM
to rethink and reinvent their R&D operations and the products they bring to
market. It helps clients leverage IBM technology, intellectual property,
research, process capabilities, systems and expertise to drive innovation into
their own core products and services. Technology Collaboration Solutions
provides expertise in the rapidly growing world of digitalization and network
connected products and services – - complementing existing customer skills with
IBM’s 50+ years of digital and information technology, insight and experience.

The worldwide leader and innovator in the creation of interactive entertainment,
Nintendo Co., Ltd., of Kyoto, Japan, manufactures and markets hardware and
software for its popular home and portable video game systems. For more
information about Nintendo, visit the company’s Web site at
www.nintendo.com