IBM To Stack Chips For Faster Data Transfer

IBM has found a way to connect chips inside products ranging from cell phones to supercomputers, an advance that promises to prolong battery life in wireless devices and eventually speed data transfers between the processor and memory chips in computers. In IBM’s solution, two chips are sandwiched on top of one another and held together by vertical connections that are etched in silicon holes that are filled with metal. The vertical connections are referred to as “through-silicon-vias,” which allow multiple chips to be stacked together with greater information flow between them. IBM could have memory-on-processor technology by 2009 for use in servers, supercomputers and other machines.


IBM has found a way to connect chips inside products ranging from cell phones to supercomputers, an advance that promises to prolong battery life in wireless devices and eventually speed data transfers between the processor and memory chips in computers. In IBM’s solution, two chips are sandwiched on top of one another and held together by vertical connections that are etched in silicon holes that are filled with metal. The vertical connections are referred to as “through-silicon-vias,” which allow multiple chips to be stacked together with greater information flow between them. IBM could have memory-on-processor technology by 2009 for use in servers, supercomputers and other machines.

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