Intel has looked into its crystal ball and seen the future of computing: a world where every device that can compute will connect to the internet without any wires altogether.

Intel has looked into its crystal ball and seen the future of computing: a world where every device that can compute will connect to the internet without any wires altogether.

 
Justin Rattner, CTO of Intel, made the prediction at the Intel Developer Forum, where he said: “In the future, if it computes, it connects. From the simplest embedded sensors to the most advanced cloud datacenters, we’re looking at techniques to allow all of them to connect without wires.”
 
To demonstrate how Intel is already working towards that future, Rattner showcased a working, all-digital Wi-Fi radio, which the chip giant is calling a “Moore's Law Radio,” referencing the principle that chips will get considerably smaller, cheaper, and more efficient at a rapidly increasing pace.
 
The one thing that is pivotal to the so-called “Internet of Things,” where virtually everything is connected to the net, is the ability to transfer data at a much faster rate than is currently possible. Intel believes the answer to this is a next-generation wireless standard called WiGig, which operates in the millimetre wavelengths of the radio spectrum and can deliver speeds of over 5 Gb/s.
 
 
“WiGig is so fast it will let you wirelessly dock your enabled Ultrabook, tablet or smartphone without wires,” said Rattner. “Even multiple displays can be docked at one time.”
 
Intel highlighted how an “always on, always connected” device could utilise Intel Smart Connect technology to preserve battery life. The device would wake up for just long enough to receive traffic, but would immediately go back to standby mode afterwards. Such techniques will probably be pivotal in a world where everything is always connected.
 
The chip firm also wants to do away with the inconvenience of passwords, while also strengthening security. It showed one of its developments in this area called Client Based Authentication Technology,  which utilises a biometric sensor to identify and admit a user to a device. Given the uniqueness of each person's hand, this could potentially be more secure, while making it considerably easier for users to log in, but the initial cost of such a feature might be a major drawback to user uptake.