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Intel 32/64-bit High-Speed ALU

Researchers from the Intel will present papers at the ISSCC that will describe a low-power, high-speed arithmetic logic unit (ALU) that can run both 32-bit and 64-bit code. This could allow the company to make Pentium-class chips that could run both types of software. The ALU churns calculations with whole numbers instead of decimals. The ALU runs at more than 7GHz in 32-bit mode and at 4GHz in 64-bit mode. Compared with existing Intel ALUs, the prototype unit increases performance by 20 percent and reduces power consumption by 56 percent. The ALU, made on the 90-nanometer process, could be inserted into either Pentium-class chips so they could run 64-bit software or Itanium chips so they could run standard Windows code better. It could go into a next-generation Pentium-style chip (Tejas).

Researchers from the Intel will present papers at the ISSCC that will describe a low-power, high-speed arithmetic logic unit (ALU) that can run both 32-bit and 64-bit code. This could allow the company to make Pentium-class chips that could run both types of software. The ALU churns calculations with whole numbers instead of decimals. The ALU runs at more than 7GHz in 32-bit mode and at 4GHz in 64-bit mode. Compared with existing Intel ALUs, the prototype unit increases performance by 20 percent and reduces power consumption by 56 percent. The ALU, made on the 90-nanometer process, could be inserted into either Pentium-class chips so they could run 64-bit software or Itanium chips so they could run standard Windows code better. It could go into a next-generation Pentium-style chip (Tejas).

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