Intel researchers plan to present a paper this week at the International Electron Devices Meeting in San Francisco outlining its work on “floating-body cell” transistors that could allow Intel to build processors with larger amounts of on-chip memory to boost performance. The floating-body cell idea is designed to improve the density of the cache memory that chip designers place on a processor. This approach also borrows from the work Intel has already done on building a trigate transistor, which envelops a transistor on three sides in order to manipulate the electrical charges. Intel is researching whether it will want to use trigate transistors within the next three to seven years, the same time frame it is eyeing for floating-body cell memory. Several hurdles remain, most notably that Intel has only made this work using silicon-on-insulator technology, a technique favored by IBM and AMD that Intel generally shuns when building its transistors. However, the goal of research like the floating-body cell work is to give Intel’s transistor teams a variety of options from which to choose when plotting its future course.

Intel researchers plan to present a paper this week at the International Electron Devices Meeting in San Francisco outlining its work on “floating-body cell” transistors that could allow Intel to build processors with larger amounts of on-chip memory to boost performance. The floating-body cell idea is designed to improve the density of the cache memory that chip designers place on a processor. This approach also borrows from the work Intel has already done on building a trigate transistor, which envelops a transistor on three sides in order to manipulate the electrical charges. Intel is researching whether it will want to use trigate transistors within the next three to seven years, the same time frame it is eyeing for floating-body cell memory. Several hurdles remain, most notably that Intel has only made this work using silicon-on-insulator technology, a technique favored by IBM and AMD that Intel generally shuns when building its transistors. However, the goal of research like the floating-body cell work is to give Intel’s transistor teams a variety of options from which to choose when plotting its future course.