intel TV Intel announces the Atom CE5300 media processor family

About a month and a half ago VR-Zone revealed Intel's Atom CE5300 series of media processors (also known as Berryville) as well as Intel's plans for Tizen and now Intel has officially announced the Atom CE5300 platform at the IPTV World Forum in London. Intel also had some of its partners at the show, displaying their very first set-top-boxes based on the new platform.

About a month and a half ago VR-Zone revealed Intel's Atom CE5300 series of media processors (also known as Berryville) as well as Intel's plans for Tizen and now Intel has officially announced the Atom CE5300 platform at the IPTV World Forum in London. Intel also had some of its partners at the show, displaying their very first set-top-boxes based on the new platform.

Intel is of course doing its best to sell the new Atom CE5300 platform and to drum up some consumer interest Intel has put a blog post detailing the advantages of Atom CE5300 SoC's making it sound like set-top-boxes based on it will be the ultimate convergence devices. Intel is bragging about console level graphics and if they're comparing themselves to the Nintendo Wii then they might be right, but considering that the graphics core should identical in terms of performance to the Cedar Trail based Atom processors, it's no PS3 or Xbox 360 graphics.

On the other hand we have no doubt that the CE5300 series of SoC's will offer more than enough performance to handle media playback of all types, in no small amount thanks to a dedicated video decoder. As we mentioned earlier, some models will also sport a hardware video encoder which should make it a good solution for PVR's as well. Intel is also hoping that the Atom CE5300 will do double duty as a home gateway and act as a cable modem, router and VoIP gateway beyond the regular set-top-box features on offer.

The real question here is how well Intel can compete with ARM based solutions which have traditionally dominated this market space. It's worth keeping in mind that many set-top-box products aren't always produced to be as cheap as possible, even though cost is always a consideration. Cable TV companies generally want products that lasts as long as possible and that are upgradable, especially when it comes to being able to offer new features to their customers that they can charge an extra service fee for and here an x86 chip might be a winner as it's far more flexible than many ARM solutions. Then again, most consumers have no idea and couldn't care less about what's inside their set-top-box, so we'll see how this one plays out.

Source: Intel