Intel Cancels Whitefield, Adds Tigerton

Intel scrapped one Quad core Xeon design, “Whitefield,” and replaced it with another, “Tigerton” set to be released in 2007. The major difference between them is that Tigerton chips are joined to the rest of the system with a technology Intel is calling the “dedicated high-speed interconnect.” With that technology, each processor will have its own connection to a computer’s chipset rather than today’s design, where chips share a data pathway called a front-side bus. Tigerton will be succeeded by another chip in 2008 code-named Dunnington and the platform is code-named Caneland. Tigerton will be built on Intel’s next-generation microarchitecture that combines Netburst and Banias micro-architecture.


Intel scrapped one Quad core Xeon design, “Whitefield,” and replaced it with another, “Tigerton” set to be released in 2007. The major difference between them is that Tigerton chips are joined to the rest of the system with a technology Intel is calling the “dedicated high-speed interconnect.” With that technology, each processor will have its own connection to a computer’s chipset rather than today’s design, where chips share a data pathway called a front-side bus. Tigerton will be succeeded by another chip in 2008 code-named Dunnington and the platform is code-named Caneland. Tigerton will be built on Intel’s next-generation microarchitecture that combines Netburst and Banias micro-architecture.

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