Intel will probably face questions about its
anticipated plans to create chips that function like the Opteron processor from
AMD, but it is fairly likely that the company won’t face a lawsuit from AMD.
Because of the details of a lengthy 1995 legal settlement between Intel and AMD,
Intel can in all probability create and sell chips that are completely
compatible with AMD’s Opteron and Athlon 64 chips, which can run both 32- and
64-bit software. Intel won’t even have to pay AMD royalties if it incorporates
ideas from any AMD patents into its chips. Intel may have to rename some of the
instructions, or commands, embedded in any chip that is similar to Opteron, but
"the code can be 100 percent compatible. Software developers will not have to
write two different versions of their applications to satisfy the market.

Microsoft will also have to write one version of Windows XP and Windows Server
2003 for computers with 32/64-bit chips. Microsoft only plans to come out with
one core version of Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 for the respective
markets each OS addresses. Windows XP for 32/64-bit systems is slated for the
second half of the year. For AMD, the existence of a 32/64-bit Intel chip would
deprive the company of a competitive advantage but they wouldn’t have to worry
about courting developers to write software for the 15 percent of the market
that AMD commands. Intel is expected to demonstrate a Pentium class chip next
week at IDF that can run 32-bit software, which is used on Windows desktops
today, and 64-bit software, which is used on high-end servers to run databases
and other complex applications. The code name for the enabling technology is
Clackamas.

Intel will probably face questions about its
anticipated plans to create chips that function like the Opteron processor from
AMD, but it is fairly likely that the company won’t face a lawsuit from AMD.
Because of the details of a lengthy 1995 legal settlement between Intel and AMD,
Intel can in all probability create and sell chips that are completely
compatible with AMD’s Opteron and Athlon 64 chips, which can run both 32- and
64-bit software. Intel won’t even have to pay AMD royalties if it incorporates
ideas from any AMD patents into its chips. Intel may have to rename some of the
instructions, or commands, embedded in any chip that is similar to Opteron, but
"the code can be 100 percent compatible. Software developers will not have to
write two different versions of their applications to satisfy the market.

Microsoft will also have to write one version of Windows XP and Windows Server
2003 for computers with 32/64-bit chips. Microsoft only plans to come out with
one core version of Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 for the respective
markets each OS addresses. Windows XP for 32/64-bit systems is slated for the
second half of the year. For AMD, the existence of a 32/64-bit Intel chip would
deprive the company of a competitive advantage but they wouldn’t have to worry
about courting developers to write software for the 15 percent of the market
that AMD commands. Intel is expected to demonstrate a Pentium class chip next
week at IDF that can run 32-bit software, which is used on Windows desktops
today, and 64-bit software, which is used on high-end servers to run databases
and other complex applications. The code name for the enabling technology is
Clackamas.