Here’s some exclusive scoop to feed your hunger. Intel will finally launch 8 core CPUs for desktops with the 2014 enthusiast grade Haswell-E platform.

Haswell E3 [EXCLUSIVE] Intel 2014 Haswell E to pack 8 cores, DDR4, X99 PCH and more

With Intel’s Ivy Bridge-E platform (scheduled for 2H 2013) to be a bummer considering the minor minor specifications and performance bump over the 2012 Sandy Bridge-E platform, all eyes turn to the 2014 Haswell-E enthusiast grade platform. And we may just have some good news that gets your excitement engines started.

Intel Haswell-E

Intel’s next-generation performance oriented platform, Haswell-E is scheduled to make its debut in the 2H of 2014. The world semiconductor leader will be stepping up its game a notch and offer an 8 core desktop CPU for the first time (the biggest leap since the introduction of 6 core CPUs a couple of years back). Perhaps this sudden urge to deliver 8 cores comes with the fact that Haswell will not be succeeded by Broadwell 14nm Tick in 2014 (I’m sorry to break all your hearts on this). Instead, we’ll be treated to a Haswell refresh, most certainly improved clock speeds at the same (never-changing) price.

We will finally have an 8-core desktop CPU from Intel!

With Haswell-E, Intel will do away with 4-core configurations of these GPU-less dies and offer users a choice of 6 and 8 core CPUs, with up to 20 MB of L3 cache. Of course, Hyper Threading isn’t going anywhere giving the CPU a maximum of 16 logical cores. Maximum TDP for the platform will lie in the range of 130W to 14oW and the processors itself will be built on 22nm 2nd generation Hi-k process.

Let’s speculate performance, Haswell-E, owing to 2 more cores (4 more threads) compared to the upcoming Ivy Bridge-E platform, and taking in all architectural enhancements into consideration, should perform between 33-50% better (best case scenario) than the 2013 enthusiast platform. Finally, a real new performance part by Intel. Of course, this won’t be a game changer as AMD continues to be virtually non-existent in competing with Intel on CPU performance (and that scenario will most likely not change in the near future as well, we’re talking AMD Steamroller here).