Intel is expected to unveil a technology that could push out the need for chip-to-chip optical interconnects to at least the 15-nm node. Intel will present a paper describing a high-speed signaling technology based on a combination of copper interconnects and CMOS. The chip-to-chip technology is a 130-nm, 8-Gbit/s source-synchronous I/O link. Using “inexpensive” digital logic circuits to overcome channel/circuit impairments, the technology also makes use of analog signal processing, digital adaptive control and built-in-self-test. The company’s I/O signaling technology is in the R&D phase, but it demonstrates that copper will remain viable for chip-to-chip interconnect applications for the foreseeable future. Copper will also push out the need for optical technology in chip-to-chip interconnect applications. Optical interconnects for chip-to-chip applications involves the conversion of electrical signals into photons, which is unstable and expensive.

Intel is expected to unveil a technology that could push out the need for chip-to-chip optical interconnects to at least the 15-nm node. Intel will present a paper describing a high-speed signaling technology based on a combination of copper interconnects and CMOS. The chip-to-chip technology is a 130-nm, 8-Gbit/s source-synchronous I/O link. Using “inexpensive” digital logic circuits to overcome channel/circuit impairments, the technology also makes use of analog signal processing, digital adaptive control and built-in-self-test. The company’s I/O signaling technology is in the R&D phase, but it demonstrates that copper will remain viable for chip-to-chip interconnect applications for the foreseeable future. Copper will also push out the need for optical technology in chip-to-chip interconnect applications. Optical interconnects for chip-to-chip applications involves the conversion of electrical signals into photons, which is unstable and expensive.