Intel is working on chipsets and other products and
technologies that will make an Itanium-based server no more expensive than a
similar machine powered by its Xeon chip by 2007. Because Itanium can provide
more performance than Xeon, the elimination of the current, often substantial,
price discrepancy could then permit Itanium to become Intel’s principal server
offering. If successful, the strategy could allow Intel to begin to phase out
Xeon after 2006. Intel will cut Itanium costs in a number of ways. The company,
for instance, is tinkering with chipsets and other parts that can be used in
both Itanium and Xeon servers. Cheaper versions of the chip also will be
introduced. High-end Itaniums also will drop in price. Top-end Itaniums now have
6MB of cache, and Montecito, a version coming in 2005, will have 24MB.

Tukwila, formerly Tanglewood, a version of the Itanium that
will be released after 2005, will feature a number of chip cores on the same
piece of silicon. Although Tukwila will have a large cache, the chip cores will
be smaller than Xeon cores, making the chip somewhat comparable in price.
Software also will become more prevalent, which should help lower the price.
Intel has already persuaded Oracle and others to port software to Itanium. Now
the company is trying to get large corporate computer users to do the same.
Intel released software, called the IA-32 execution layer, that will let Itanium
servers run standard Windows code with better performance than earlier emulation
technologies. A version for Red Hat will come out later this year.

Intel is working on chipsets and other products and
technologies that will make an Itanium-based server no more expensive than a
similar machine powered by its Xeon chip by 2007. Because Itanium can provide
more performance than Xeon, the elimination of the current, often substantial,
price discrepancy could then permit Itanium to become Intel’s principal server
offering. If successful, the strategy could allow Intel to begin to phase out
Xeon after 2006. Intel will cut Itanium costs in a number of ways. The company,
for instance, is tinkering with chipsets and other parts that can be used in
both Itanium and Xeon servers. Cheaper versions of the chip also will be
introduced. High-end Itaniums also will drop in price. Top-end Itaniums now have
6MB of cache, and Montecito, a version coming in 2005, will have 24MB.

Tukwila, formerly Tanglewood, a version of the Itanium that
will be released after 2005, will feature a number of chip cores on the same
piece of silicon. Although Tukwila will have a large cache, the chip cores will
be smaller than Xeon cores, making the chip somewhat comparable in price.
Software also will become more prevalent, which should help lower the price.
Intel has already persuaded Oracle and others to port software to Itanium. Now
the company is trying to get large corporate computer users to do the same.
Intel released software, called the IA-32 execution layer, that will let Itanium
servers run standard Windows code with better performance than earlier emulation
technologies. A version for Red Hat will come out later this year.

 
H2 2004

2005

2006-07
Itanium MPMadison 9M
(1.5Ghz, 9MB L3, Q3)
Montecito
Dual Core
(~2Ghz, 90nm, 24MB L3)
Tukwila
Multi Core
(65nm, 32MB L3?)
Itanium DPFanwood
(1.5Ghz, Q3)
Fanwood
(533Mhz, Q4)
Fanwood LV
(1Ghz, DP)
Millington

Millington LV