lynx point Intel Lynx Point chipset details leaked

Ivy Bridge is still a month and a half out, yet details of Intel's 2013 platform keeps leaking like there's no tomorrow. The latest leak gives us a much better idea as to what to expect from the Lynx Point chipset, or the Intel 8-series as it will be known when it arrives sometime in the first half of 2013.

Ivy Bridge is still a month and a half out, yet details of Intel's 2013 platform keeps leaking like there's no tomorrow. The latest leak gives us a much better idea as to what to expect from the Lynx Point chipset, or the Intel 8-series as it will be known when it arrives sometime in the first half of 2013.

As you hopefully already are aware of, Haswell will be using a different socket compared to Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge and it's simply known as LGA-1150 at this stage. Some of Intel's changes in the architecture between Ivy Bridge and Haswell meant that certain parts currently residing inside the chipset has been moved into the CPU and Lynx Point will as such in some ways be less advanced than Intel's upcoming 7-series. One of the major changes is that the digital display outputs are now going straight from the CPU to the ports without the need of going via the chipset, although the good old analogue VGA interface still has to go via the chipset.

But let's cut to the chase and look at the important stuff, as Intel has finally added full SATA 6Gbps support to all six SATA ports. Intel is only three years behind AMD to offer SATA 6Gbps speeds on all the ports, but at least it's coming. What's more is that Intel is adding two more USB 3.0 ports compared to the upcoming 7-series chipsets for a total of six USB 3.0 ports. Intel has also added something called I/O port flexibility here, a feature that seems to suggest that it should potentially be possible to re-allocate which ports are USB 3.0 and which are USB 2.0.

lynx point Intel Lynx Point chipset details leaked

Other new additions include SSD performance and power optimizations, new Rapid Storage driver enhancements, lower TDP and power usage, a smaller package at 22x23mm and support for quad-read SPI flash memory for the UEFI to be stored in. The bad news is that it appears as if Intel hasn't as yet moved to a faster DMI interface, although there's nothing to the contrary either, so we'll just have to wait and see. The chipset PCI Express ports are at least still stuck at PCI Express 2.0 suggesting that the DMI bus hasn't changed.

As with Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge, it looks like the LGA-1150 socket will last for two CPU generations, so Lynx Point will as such be good for Haswell and Broadwell, the 14nm shrink of Haswell. Intel is still citing a fairly broad timeline for the launch of Haswell, putting it somewhere between March and June of 2013, but until then we'll have Ivy Bridge to play with.

Source: Zol.com.cn